Hands-On

I don’t know about you, but I’m a hands-on kind of person. I like to roll up my sleeves and learn the intricacies of things so I can understand them better. Recently I signed up for a Creating Web Pages class. I want to develop an official website, and I figured it was worth the expense for me to learn how to do it myself.

Developing your writing style is a step-by-step hands-on process. You can talk about being a writer all you want, but you aren’t going to learn about proper sentence structure or developing plots and storylines until you put your words and ideas down onto your paper. You need to roll up your sleeves and write.

What do you write about? Anything and everything at first. You need to get comfortable formulating your thoughts, which will eventually lead to creating stories. For some this will be an easy transition; for others it will take both time and dedication.

So grab a pen and paper or pull out your computer keyboard. Sit down and write. Gets hands-on experience so you can become the writer you’ve always wanted to be.

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Waiting in the Wings

I enjoy plays, especially musicals. I love how the actors use their talents to bring the performance to life.  Adherence to stage direction is vital, because if the timing is off and an actor comes in before his cue, then the whole performance can end in disaster. The same is for the backstage crew. If they don’t cue the lights or the music or the sound effects at the right time, they could make even a Broadway production look amateurish.

Our writing is like a theatrical production. We each play a unique part that God has specifically designed for us. Some of us will be a supporting cast member or maybe an understudy. Some will work behind the scenes, prepping others for a greater work. Some will be able to step out on stage and stand in the spotlight, even if only for a brief moment.

As writers we are waiting in the wings. We are waiting for God, the most perfect stage manager and director we’ll ever have, to tell us when it’s our time to shine. Sometimes we try to rush out on stage beforehand because of  impatience. But if we want to be the best we can possibly be, then we need to follow His lead, trust His cues, and submit to His direction.

So don’t be discouraged while you’re waiting in the wings. The final outcome will be the best event you could ever imagine.

Called to Write

I have been called to write. It was never a serious intention of my life to become a scribe, but that is exactly the path God provided for me. And now that I know it’s the direction God wants me to take, and I have whole-heartily accepted this design for my life, I am pursuing its avenues with dedication and perseverance.

What about you? Is writing a serious pursuit or just a hobby? If it is a serious pursuit, are you learning all you can about this craft? Are you taking classes, joining a critique group, and reading up on the latest information? If not, then you need to. You will never develop the essential skills you need to be a good and effective writer if you don’t take the time to hone your gifts.

God gives each of us talents. If writing is yours, get serious and learn all you can to become the scribe God has called you to be.

An Encouraging Quote

I read this in an article about Daniel Handler, the author who wrote A Series of Unfortunate Events under the pseudonym Lemony Snicket. He said, “So much of writing is mere contemplation, and it took me a few years to find validity in this idea. One day I’d write 12 pages, and the next I’d sit around and think and eke out one paragraph, and it took me awhile to realize that was a legitimate use of time. Stephen Merritt, a songwriter I collaborate with, helped me see that, as long as what I’m doing is moving my brain forward, it’s OK.”
I love this quote because we are working when we think. Before we can set our words down onto paper, we must have ideas to place there, and that takes using our brains.
Are you pushing yourself to get a certain number of pages written each day? Don’t forget that the thinking process counts as work, too.